Tigre Street Art Festival 100 x 100 | Buenos Aires Street Art

Tigre Street Art Festival 100 x 100 | Buenos Aires Street Art

On Monday I joined my friend Matt of Buenos Aires Street Art to check out the newest murals in town by some very talented artists. The train ride there and back was uncomfortable, hot, and packed, but it was all worth it when we were able to see the newest Buenos Aires street art.

One of the newest artists on the scene, Gus Ansaldi, next to his four armed goddess.

One of the newest artists on the scene, Gus Ansaldi, next to his four armed goddess.

Our first stop was at the Mercado de Frutas (fruit market,) which is a bustling tourist market on weekends. On this Monday, however, it was pretty quiet. It was very hot, and everyone was at work, so not many people walking around. I couldn’t imagine painting all day in the 37C heat, but these great artists were braving the elements to put their work up.

Lean Frizzera, one of Buenos Aires' most prolific street artists, in front of his rocker elephants.

Lean Frizzera, one of Buenos Aires’ most prolific street artists, in front of his rocker elephants.

The first two artists we met, Lean Frizzera and Gus Ansaldi were working on a great wall in the heart of the Mercado de Frutas. Lean is a super friendly guy, and was chatting with us about what a great wall they had to paint. He put a bit of an inside joke into his work too, putting the cap of his band on the yellow elephant.

Gus working on his goddess, with Lean's elephants beside him.

Gus working on his goddess, with Lean’s elephants beside him.

After chatting with Gus and Lean for a bit, we took our leave and found a wall in a pretty rough part of town that was being painted by five artists: Marcos Bourdetta, Mati Quiroga, Mariela Ajras, Patxi Mazzoni Alonso and El Marian. We took a cab there, had the cab wait for us, and didn’t walk anywhere. This wasn’t a neighbourhood where flashing a SLR camera would be wise.

A wall in a 'barrio bravo'. It was a fantastic wall, on the side of a factory. Perfect for the artists, but not somewhere we'd take a tour.

A wall in a ‘barrio bravo’. It was a fantastic wall, on the side of a factory. Perfect for the artists, but not somewhere we’d take a tour.

One of my favourite things about street art is the fact that you are bringing the art to the people. The people in this neighbourhood are not likely to go to the MALBA or the Museo de Bellas Artes. Every day, however, they can be reminded of beauty and art right there in their rough neighbourhood. It’s an art-form that can help change the landscape of a neighbourhood, and bring life to the streets. This was definitely happening here.

Mariano, El Marian, in front of his fantastically colourful reproduction of a photo of a child hanging from a clothesline.

Mariano, El Marian, in front of his fantastically colourful reproduction of a photo of a child hanging from a clothesline.

This is one of the principals of street art; that art shouldn’t be confined to galleries and the people in the social class or with the time to visit the galleries. The world is beautiful, and art should be everywhere.

Marcos Bourdetta's fun piece of a chimp on a scooter.

Marcos Bourdetta’s fun piece of a chimp on a scooter.

These artists were definitely making this neighbourhood more beautiful, and when I’ve had the chance to talk to locals, they are truly appreciative of the art that is being brought to them. The artists frequently draw crowds, too. The locals are interested, and respect what is being put up, so they make sure that nothing happens to them while they’re painting. Amazing what can happen when you bring art to the world.

Patxi Mazzoni Alonso's Punk

Patxi Mazzoni Alonso’s Punk

A woman smoking by Mariela Ajras.

A woman smoking by Mariela Ajras.

All pictures were taken by me in Tigre, Argentina. All of these murals were part of the Tigre 100 x 100 street art festival put on by Estilo Libre (Free Style.)

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